Student Hearing Officer Committee

cmusccAs one of the requirements of the Leader Advancement Scholarship, we are required to serve on a University committee during our junior or senior year. To fulfill this requirement, I served the Student Hearing Officer Committee under the Office of Student Conduct during my junior year.

This committee is made up of a group of 20-30 CMU students that undergo a 3-hour training about the process of student hearings and CMU’s student code of conduct. During this training, we learned about the discipline hearing process at the university level and went over many scenarios and discussed whether or not the student in that scenario was in violation of CMU’s student code of conduct.

Our role as students on the committee was not only to undergo this training but it was to also sit in on student hearings as a student officer to make sure that students were getting fair treatment during the student hearing process.

Serving on this committee has allowed me to deepen my understanding of university rules and procedure while also working together with fellow CMU students to ensure every student was getting fair treatment during their hearing.

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SMEA

Screen Shot 2017-04-02 at 12.40.46 PMSince Spring Semester of my freshman year of college, I have been involved in an RSO on campus called Student Michigan Education Association. SMEA is a registered student organization for future educators to gain professional development opportunities, networking, and acquire valuable resources before going into the education field.

One of my favorite parts of being part of SMEA is the weekly speakers. At each meeting, we invite a different speaker, usually a CMU faculty member or someone in the education field, to speak about a specific topic revolving around teaching. These speakers often discuss topics that are not talked about in depth in our courses here at school and have helped greatly expand my knowledge about the world of education.

Additionally, this organization has allowed me to network with other future educators Screen Shot 2017-04-02 at 12.41.36 PMwho have become close friends and has allowed me to give back to the community through events such as Relay for Life and our Outreach to Teach Community Service Project.

I’m very grateful to be part of an organization that helps me grow both professionally and personally.

PHL 118L

519BFCtEjqL._SX397_BO1,204,203,200_.jpgAs part of the protocol for the Leader Advancement Scholarship, my classmates and I had the opportunity to take Philosophy 118L: Moral Problems during the Fall 2016 semester.

Every Tuesday and Thursday, my classmates and I met bright and early at 8 am to discuss exactly that, moral problems within society. However, we didn’t debate these topics, but rather we discussed these issues from a moral standpoint, talking about what justified whether something was morally right or wrong. We discussed everything from abortion to capital punishment to wealth distribution and everything in between.

I really enjoyed the course as it opened my eyes to many viewpoints on controversial subjects. I often would go into the class thinking I had a certain view about a topic, but by the time class was over, my viewpoint had completely changed because I never thought about an issue in that way. The course made me realize that there is no “right” or “wrong” viewpoint on any given subject. Rather, it is the moral views that you hold as an individual that shape your beliefs.

As I student studying leadership, I found this course to be very applicable in almost every aspect of life. Throughout my entire life, I will meet people with different views, values, and beliefs. Though someone may hold different opinions than I do, it is important to be able to gain an understanding of the other views that people hold and why they hold them as it can help you understand and get to know that person on a deeper level.

Overall, I found this course to be very valuable as a student leader, in my future career field, and as a human being.