KME Math Club

Screen Shot 2018-11-03 at 4.20.13 PMJoining Kappa Mu Epsilon (CMU’s undergraduate math honor society) has been one of the best decisions I’ve made as a student. As a mathematics education major, I was involved in a teaching student organization for all future educators, however, I wanted to join an organization that would further my math knowledge as well.

I learned about KME through some friends in my Abstract Algebra class. They were looking to have more members join KME and I wanted to join a math organization so it was a perfect fit.

As KME members, we offer professional development by having professors come in and present workshops or talks. Additionally, we also do fun math game nights in the form of Jeopardy or Kahoot to sharpen up our math skills. One of my favorite parts of KME is the volunteer tutoring workshop we put on. The Math Assistance Center is always closed during the Friday before final exam week. As KME members, we volunteer our time during that day and put on a free tutoring workshop to help students with their last-minute math questions.

I’ve really loved being part of KME and I will definitely miss this organization when I graduate.

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Lead Team: LAS in The D

 

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A sign inside CASS Community Services, where LAS students volunteer during the trip.

This year I had the opportunity to serve on the LAS in The D Lead Team. This lead team, a committee of upperclassmen-Leader Advancement Scholars, is responsible for planning the annual service trip in Detroit that LAS Freshmen attend each year. The LAS Freshmen attend this trip as part of their LDR 200 course to learn about the city of Detroit and to put leadership practices, like servant leadership, to action.

Unfortunately, the due to an impending snowstorm, the trip was canceled this year. However, being on this lead team and planning this trip for the freshmen was a very growing experience. For the past 3 years, I have been involved with the LAS in The D Service Trip. My freshman year I was a participant, and my sophomore and junior years I was on the lead team.

What I learned most from this experience was the importance of synergy when working together in a group setting to plan an event like the LAS in The D Trip. Each member of the lead team brought with them different experiences they had on their trip or experiences they had previously as facilitators. While we each had our own experiences with the trip in the past, we were able to come together and compile a list of strong aspects of the trip as well as aspects that could be improved on in order for the freshmen to get as much out of the trip as possible.

Additionally, our lead team worked together to have one overarching goal for the 2018 trip. Many lead team members brought up that it would be beneficial to make the discussions and the reflection guides more intentional. During our meetings, we sat down and looked through each reflection question and found ways to make those questions more introspective and thought-provoking. Having intentionality as our overall goal allowed our team to brainstorm many ways to make this trip more intentional for the freshmen.

Overall, the LAS in The D Lead Team was a growing experience and allowed us to come together and work toward putting an impactful service trip together for this year’s freshmen.

 

HDF 110

Screen Shot 2018-11-03 at 11.12.04 AMThis summer I also had the opportunity to take HDF 110, a class about the roots of oppression. I took this class online during the summer because of my busy Fall and Spring semester schedules. Before this class, I had limited knowledge on how oppression truly impacted our society. I knew that there were oppressed groups, but I never understood how those groups came to have fewer privileges than other groups of people.

Not only did this class educate me on the foundation of racism and oppression, but it also helped me realize the actions I can take to help make our world to a less oppressive place. I learned that in the context of oppression, anyone and everyone can be a leader. You just have to be aware of your actions and how they impact others.

HDF 110 made me aware of the oppressive system that is in place in The United States. However, it also made me aware that I have the power to make a difference and to do my part in making our world a better place.

COM 461

Screen Shot 2018-11-03 at 11.13.53 AMThis summer I had the opportunity to take COM 461 (communication in leadership) as an online class. Because I am trying to graduate within four years, I was unable to take this course with my cohort during the spring semester.

I really enjoyed that this course was real-life application based. My professor assigned case studies that dealt with leadership situations in the real world. For instance, we discussed conflict management in the workplace and collaboration with colleagues. I enjoyed that leadership was discussed mainly in the real world, since most leadership discussions I’ve had in college focused mainly on student organizations.

Additionally, taking the course with non-LAS students allowed me to gain a wider variety of perspectives on leadership issues. In my course, there were student-athletes, presidents’ of student organizations, and even foreign exchange students. Each student brought a valuable perspective to our class and allowed me to see leadership in many different contexts.

I really enjoyed this course and it taught me many leadership skills that I will be able to use now and after graduation.

 

PHL 118L

519BFCtEjqL._SX397_BO1,204,203,200_.jpgAs part of the protocol for the Leader Advancement Scholarship, my classmates and I had the opportunity to take Philosophy 118L: Moral Problems during the Fall 2016 semester.

Every Tuesday and Thursday, my classmates and I met bright and early at 8 am to discuss exactly that, moral problems within society. However, we didn’t debate these topics, but rather we discussed these issues from a moral standpoint, talking about what justified whether something was morally right or wrong. We discussed everything from abortion to capital punishment to wealth distribution and everything in between.

I really enjoyed the course as it opened my eyes to many viewpoints on controversial subjects. I often would go into the class thinking I had a certain view about a topic, but by the time class was over, my viewpoint had completely changed because I never thought about an issue in that way. The course made me realize that there is no “right” or “wrong” viewpoint on any given subject. Rather, it is the moral views that you hold as an individual that shape your beliefs.

As I student studying leadership, I found this course to be very applicable in almost every aspect of life. Throughout my entire life, I will meet people with different views, values, and beliefs. Though someone may hold different opinions than I do, it is important to be able to gain an understanding of the other views that people hold and why they hold them as it can help you understand and get to know that person on a deeper level.

Overall, I found this course to be very valuable as a student leader, in my future career field, and as a human being.

PSC 105

pscThis past summer, I had the opportunity to take an introductory course in United States Government. As part of my Leader Advancement Scholarship Protocol, we have the choice to take PSC 105 or a sociology course. Since I had already taken a few sociology classes in high school, I decided to challenge myself by taking the government and politics course.

However, unlike many of my classmates, I enrolled in the course over the summer rather than during the school year. Since the Teacher Education Program is very long and intensive, I didn’t have room for it during this spring when my classmates would have normally taken it. Instead, I took it in an 8-week online format at the community college at home.

Throughout the 8 week course, we discussed every aspect of government and politics. From investigating every branch to learning about political parties, and governments around the world, we touched on ideas and concepts I had not known of prior to this course. Additionally, I really appreciated how my instructor didn’t hide the flaws and issues that are taking place in our government but rather used them as discussion points for our course.

After taking this course, I feel more well-rounded as both a United States Citizen and a student studying leadership in general. It is so important to educate ourselves on actions taking place within our government and to be an active citizen. Also, this course taught me a great deal about the many leadership positions held within the government and how each of these leaders make decisions that greatly impact our everyday lives.

Overall, I really enjoyed this course and greatly enjoyed learning more about our nation’s government and politics.

LDR 200L: Introduction to Leadership

70fd428d669eb1c63d37b3ca5157c1b6When I found out part of LAS Protocol was to take a three credit leadership course with my fellow LAS-ers, I couldn’t have been more excited. Although I had taken Student Leadership classes throughout high school and have been to countless camps, trainings, and workshops, I was excited to gain new college-level perspectives on leadership.

One of my favorite parts of this course, besides bonding over weekly snacks and Wednesday night dinners at the Robinson cafeteria after class, was learning more in depth about what researchers say leadership is.

Though learning about theories for three hours straight may sound boring, the way the material was presented in this course was a breath of fresh air; we were put into groups and were assigned to create an interactive workshop about the theory and how it is relevant to our lives as college students. By learning through this format, it was easy to understand complex theories and apply them to our everyday lives.

Also, there are some pretty neat aspects of this course that are unlike any other college class I’ve ever taken that I will apply to my future classroom one day:

  • A warm, welcoming classroom environment
  • Powerpoint presentations that don’t have 8,233,936 words on one slide
  • Funny, but relevant, videos
  • A genuine care for the success of all students
  • Lively, engaging lectures and activities
  • Self-reflection
  • and so much more

I still have about a month left in LDR 200L, thankfully. In this last month I’m excited to:

  • Receive my own mentee ❤
  • Present my workshop on The Social Change Model
  • Travel to Detroit, Michigan and volunteer with my cohort
  • Continue to develop as a leader and learn more about how others perceive leadership