Lead Team: LAS in The D

 

unnamed.jpg

A sign inside CASS Community Services, where LAS students volunteer during the trip.

This year I had the opportunity to serve on the LAS in The D Lead Team. This lead team, a committee of upperclassmen-Leader Advancement Scholars, is responsible for planning the annual service trip in Detroit that LAS Freshmen attend each year. The LAS Freshmen attend this trip as part of their LDR 200 course to learn about the city of Detroit and to put leadership practices, like servant leadership, to action.

Unfortunately, the due to an impending snowstorm, the trip was canceled this year. However, being on this lead team and planning this trip for the freshmen was a very growing experience. For the past 3 years, I have been involved with the LAS in The D Service Trip. My freshman year I was a participant, and my sophomore and junior years I was on the lead team.

What I learned most from this experience was the importance of synergy when working together in a group setting to plan an event like the LAS in The D Trip. Each member of the lead team brought with them different experiences they had on their trip or experiences they had previously as facilitators. While we each had our own experiences with the trip in the past, we were able to come together and compile a list of strong aspects of the trip as well as aspects that could be improved on in order for the freshmen to get as much out of the trip as possible.

Additionally, our lead team worked together to have one overarching goal for the 2018 trip. Many lead team members brought up that it would be beneficial to make the discussions and the reflection guides more intentional. During our meetings, we sat down and looked through each reflection question and found ways to make those questions more introspective and thought-provoking. Having intentionality as our overall goal allowed our team to brainstorm many ways to make this trip more intentional for the freshmen.

Overall, the LAS in The D Lead Team was a growing experience and allowed us to come together and work toward putting an impactful service trip together for this year’s freshmen.

 

Advertisements

PHL 118L

519BFCtEjqL._SX397_BO1,204,203,200_.jpgAs part of the protocol for the Leader Advancement Scholarship, my classmates and I had the opportunity to take Philosophy 118L: Moral Problems during the Fall 2016 semester.

Every Tuesday and Thursday, my classmates and I met bright and early at 8 am to discuss exactly that, moral problems within society. However, we didn’t debate these topics, but rather we discussed these issues from a moral standpoint, talking about what justified whether something was morally right or wrong. We discussed everything from abortion to capital punishment to wealth distribution and everything in between.

I really enjoyed the course as it opened my eyes to many viewpoints on controversial subjects. I often would go into the class thinking I had a certain view about a topic, but by the time class was over, my viewpoint had completely changed because I never thought about an issue in that way. The course made me realize that there is no “right” or “wrong” viewpoint on any given subject. Rather, it is the moral views that you hold as an individual that shape your beliefs.

As I student studying leadership, I found this course to be very applicable in almost every aspect of life. Throughout my entire life, I will meet people with different views, values, and beliefs. Though someone may hold different opinions than I do, it is important to be able to gain an understanding of the other views that people hold and why they hold them as it can help you understand and get to know that person on a deeper level.

Overall, I found this course to be very valuable as a student leader, in my future career field, and as a human being.

PSC 105

pscThis past summer, I had the opportunity to take an introductory course in United States Government. As part of my Leader Advancement Scholarship Protocol, we have the choice to take PSC 105 or a sociology course. Since I had already taken a few sociology classes in high school, I decided to challenge myself by taking the government and politics course.

However, unlike many of my classmates, I enrolled in the course over the summer rather than during the school year. Since the Teacher Education Program is very long and intensive, I didn’t have room for it during this spring when my classmates would have normally taken it. Instead, I took it in an 8-week online format at the community college at home.

Throughout the 8 week course, we discussed every aspect of government and politics. From investigating every branch to learning about political parties, and governments around the world, we touched on ideas and concepts I had not known of prior to this course. Additionally, I really appreciated how my instructor didn’t hide the flaws and issues that are taking place in our government but rather used them as discussion points for our course.

After taking this course, I feel more well-rounded as both a United States Citizen and a student studying leadership in general. It is so important to educate ourselves on actions taking place within our government and to be an active citizen. Also, this course taught me a great deal about the many leadership positions held within the government and how each of these leaders make decisions that greatly impact our everyday lives.

Overall, I really enjoyed this course and greatly enjoyed learning more about our nation’s government and politics.

LDR 200L: Introduction to Leadership

70fd428d669eb1c63d37b3ca5157c1b6When I found out part of LAS Protocol was to take a three credit leadership course with my fellow LAS-ers, I couldn’t have been more excited. Although I had taken Student Leadership classes throughout high school and have been to countless camps, trainings, and workshops, I was excited to gain new college-level perspectives on leadership.

One of my favorite parts of this course, besides bonding over weekly snacks and Wednesday night dinners at the Robinson cafeteria after class, was learning more in depth about what researchers say leadership is.

Though learning about theories for three hours straight may sound boring, the way the material was presented in this course was a breath of fresh air; we were put into groups and were assigned to create an interactive workshop about the theory and how it is relevant to our lives as college students. By learning through this format, it was easy to understand complex theories and apply them to our everyday lives.

Also, there are some pretty neat aspects of this course that are unlike any other college class I’ve ever taken that I will apply to my future classroom one day:

  • A warm, welcoming classroom environment
  • Powerpoint presentations that don’t have 8,233,936 words on one slide
  • Funny, but relevant, videos
  • A genuine care for the success of all students
  • Lively, engaging lectures and activities
  • Self-reflection
  • and so much more

I still have about a month left in LDR 200L, thankfully. In this last month I’m excited to:

  • Receive my own mentee ❤
  • Present my workshop on The Social Change Model
  • Travel to Detroit, Michigan and volunteer with my cohort
  • Continue to develop as a leader and learn more about how others perceive leadership

 

HST 110L WI: The American Experience

Screen Shot 2016-03-22 at 3.17.56 PM.pngBefore going into HST 110L WI, I heard many different opinions from upperclassmen about this course:

“Get ready to read 200 pages a week”
“She doesn’t like to give “A’s” very often so if you care about your GPA, Take it credit/no credit”
“Good luck..”

After hearing these comments, I was a little scared for this course.

Over the past 10 weeks, I’ve come to realize HST 110L WI has been one of the most challenging courses I’ve had to take this far. With 150+ pages of reading a week, multiple choice exams every other week, 5-8 page papers, and essay exams, let’s just say I became a frequent Starbucks customer.

Though this course has certainly been challenging, I have enjoyed getting to learn more about leadership in the government over the past couple hundred years. It has been intriguing to learn about renown leaders such as George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, and Teddy Roosevelt and how each of their leadership styles created different changes that affected America forever.

Though there are still 6 weeks left in HST 110L WI, I’m hoping that I will be able to further my understanding of influential leaders in American history.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Leadership Comes from Saying Yes

d1352bb06a6b6bfcdb0dcebf051e93a0When I think of leadership and the multitude of decisions that leaders make on a daily basis, I believe that true leadership comes from saying yes.

Everything about leadership revolves around the principle of saying yes. Being a leader means that you’re willing to say “Yes, the world we live in can be made better and I am going to be part of that change.” Being a leader means you’re willing to say yes to the challenges and obstacles you will face and not steer away from them. Being a leader means you’re willing to say yes to leaping outside of your comfort zone and not just living inside your shell. And being a leader means you’re willing to say yes, I am passionate about this and yes, I am going to put my passion to action.5f0a2d9b2e484eb511006908f44c9e79

Martin Luther King Jr., Rosa Parks, George Washington and Nelson Mandela are world renown leaders because they chose to say “This isn’t how things should be and yes, I am going to take a stand to make our world a better place.”

True leaders know that saying yes isn’t always the easy choice. If it was easy to accept the challenge of trying to change the world, everyone would do it. If it was easy to challenge yourself to be a better person every day, everyone would do it.

We live in a world where it isn’t always easy to say yes, and that’s why leadership comes from a yes.

True Leadership

If an ordinary perIMG_6165son was stopped on the street and asked to name someone who is a leader, they would probably respond with a well-known figure such as Barack Obama, Oprah, or Steve Jobs. Contrary to public opinion, most leaders are not necessarily people who hold positions in the government or hold a special title. In fact, the world’s most influential leaders are often people we interact with in our everyday life that challenge us to be better, inspire us to reach out to others, and remind us to live a life filled with gratitude and compassion.

When I was asked in my LDR 200 class to identify someone who is a leader, the first person who came to mind was not Barack Obama, Oprah, or even Steve Jobs. The first person who came to mind was my mom.

My mom is one of the most selfless people I’ve ever met. I’ve come to realize what makes my mom a leader is her unconditional desire to help others and her compassion for everyone she comes in contact with. You see, my mom is a leader by leading through others. Whether it’s her genuine compassion towards her patients at work, creating intentional relationships with everyone she meets, or devoting her time and energy to volunteering in the community, she portrays the type of selflessness that a true leader possesses.

While she may not realize it, my mom has had a tremendous impact on so many lives, including my own. Her everyday actions of selflessness and true kindness inspire others to “pay it forward”. The intentional relationships she creates inspires others to form more intentional relationships of their own. But most importantly, her gratitude and optimistic outlook on life remind many people, including myself, that life is a blessing that should be cherished every day.